Quentin De Meuter

h_freeze
Mister freeze, hilarious

h_firebug
firebug, HILARIOUS

h_joker
Joker, HILARIOUS

h_nostromos
nostromos, HILARIOUS

bb2
Belgian bowl

bb3
Belgian bowl

blackmouse2
Black mouses (band)

blackmouse3
BLACK MOUSE (BAND)

gé1

kimberly
Kimberly

Work by Quentin De Meuter. Based in Belgium.

What style do you prefer?
I love pictures implying people and creative lights. So my style fits editorials portraits and commercial photography. But at the end I just like to create any picture that tell a story with my style and universe. Who are influenced by music and movies.

How do you get your inspiration?
Do I told you about the time I spend on the Internet to get inspired? A LOT! I also get a lot of inspirations from movies.

What kind of tools do you use?
I’ve limited my tools to the minimum : a Fuji X-E2 and some cobra flashes. I use a Westcott Appollo Octobox with a grid to diffuse my light and I work mostly with a prime 35mm. I also do some studio shoot with a Canon 5D (waiting that Fuji does a tethering camera…) with some studio lights. I do my retouching on an iMac.

What advise can you give to people?
Have fun, try new things and be exacting with your self to reach news limits and boundaries.

Favorite websites?
https://www.behance.net / http://pinterest.com/ / http://fstoppers.com

Check out more work by Quentin De Meuter here

Alexis Marcou

Freefly-Systems-Movi
Freefly Systems

the-WAIT
the Wait

Derwent-Union-Jack
Derwent Union-Jack

dwfrfr
Nike MLB

fregeg
Nike – House Of Hoops

wrgtegte
Nike – Galatasaray Lion

efgrt
Nike Falcons

BMW-Stand
BMW Stand – Mutabor

gregt
Red Deer

fghjtuehytre
Hewlett-Packard

Work by Alexis Marcou. Based in United Kingdom.

What style do you prefer?
Contemporary.

How do you get your inspiration?
From any source that is available to me at the time.

What kind of tools do you use?
Pencils, Photoshop, Watercolors, Acrylics, Ink, Charcoal, Graphite, Wacom tablet.

What advise can you give to people?
Just Do It.

Favorite websites?
http://www.behance.net / http://www.baubauhaus.com / http://www.vmagazine.com / http://www.yatzer.com

Check out more work by Alexis Marcou here

Zeren Badar

after orgasm

after orgasm

coins

coins

endless love

endless love

gift

gift

glutony

glutony

Homage to Gustave Klimnt

Homage to Gustave Klimnt

Lady Gaga

Lady Gaga

penetrated

penetrated

sea world

sea world

very first accident

very first accident

Work by Zeren Badar. Based in The United States.

What style do you prefer?
I prefer still life and conceptual photography.

How do you get your inspiration?
I read a lot of art history book. I visit museums and art galleries very often.

What kind of tools do you use?
Sony NEX7, Speed Lights, Portable soft boxes.

What advise can you give to people?
Be persistent! Don’t give up! Have fun with it!

Favorite websites?
www.tumblr.com

Check out more work by Zeren Badar here

Albin Thelander

One fairly light-headed man

One fairly light-headed man

With frozen feet we wander

With frozen feet we wander

Individual

Individual

In a reality where nothing is real

In a reality where nothing is real

From one story to another

From one story to another

What these eyes have seen

What these eyes have seen

As in a fairytale

As in a fairytale

Playing with the fire till the fire played with me

Playing with the fire till the fire played with me

Trouble with the television

Trouble with the television

The sons of water

The sons of water

Work by Albin Thelander. Based in Sweden.

What style do you prefer?
I prefer fine art, conceptual and surrealistic photography. Anything that makes me think.

How do you get your inspiration?
I get inspired by my everyday life and thoughts.

What kind of tools do you use?
I use a camera, tripod, self timer and Photoshop to create my art. As well as my creativity!

What advise can you give to people?
Be yourself and try whatever idea you get, you never know how it will end up and where it will lead.

Favorite websites?
www.flickr.com / getinspiredmagazine.com / www.facebook.com / www.tumblr.com

Check out more work by Albin Thelander here

Sblendone

E' solo persona, no essere umano

E’ solo persona, no essere umano

sulla strada dell'infinito

sulla strada dell’infinito

sulla mia strada

sulla mia strada

parabole nascoste

parabole nascoste

nel frattempo nel Pantheon

nel frattempo nel Pantheon

luci

luci

L'incontro

L’incontro

barba villa borghese

barba villa borghese

asfissia

asfissia

ulima sarro

ulima sarro

Work by Sblendone. Based in Italy.

What style do you prefer?
I don’t prefer a particular style. I love when the artist express himself through the opera.

How do you get your inspiration?
I get my inspiration through the things around me. From some years I’m searching to realize me, I would be a Humaing being. It means that you don’t have a mind closed, that you must to think with a conscious and perfect mind. I’m trying to give a personal point of view of the world!

What kind of tools do you use?
I’m using my laptop and my reflex Canon 6D.

What advise can you give to people?
The only advise that I can give is this: “Make the things which will you make happy”, this is the first step to make the world better.

Favorite websites?
www.flickr.com / www.behance.net / fstoppers.com

Check out more work by Sblendone here

Nicolai Amter

Tits Of Death

Tits Of Death

Tits Of Death Live

Tits Of Death Live

The Peryls

The Peryls

Stuart Newman

Stuart Newman

Nude

Nude

Night

Night

Nicola Campbell

Nicola Campbell

Light

Light

Gangster

Gangster

Alex Vargas

Alex Vargas

Work by Nicolai Amter. Based in The United Kingdom.

What style do you prefer?
I like to keep it simple and shoot with natural light on location, maybe with a light reflector or two but that’s it. I shoot handheld and like my shots to have a filmic and cinematic quality.

How do you get your inspiration?
That comes very much from the person I’m shooting and the location.

What kind of tools do you use?
My Canon 5D mk III and a range of old Nikon lenses (mostly 35mm, 50mm, 85mm). Post in Apple Aperture.

What advise can you give to people?
A camera doesn’t make a photographer. Use what you have and shoot everyday.

Favorite websites?
pinterest.com / behance.com / ffffound.com

Check out more work by Nicolai Amter here

Liselotte Fleur

fleur de la nuit

fleur de la nuit

get lost and find yourself

get lost and find yourself

golden times

golden times

golden times

golden times

sleeping awake

sleeping awake

there is a world behind my eyes

there is a world behind my eyes

the storm

the storm

the wanderer

the wanderer

wait and see

wait and see

wait and see

wait and see

Work by Liselotte Fleur. Based in The Netherlands.

What style do you prefer?
I love to work with the interaction between fashion, nature and art. Photography gives me the opportunity to tell my own stories, and express my dreams and thoughts on beautiful locations with the influence of fashion.

How do you get your inspiration?
I’m always searching for little surprises when I’m behind the camera. I can find these in my fascination for perfection, unexpected moments and working with daylight. I also get inspired from people/models with special faces, when I see someone like this, I can’t wait to have him or her in front of my camera.

What kind of tools do you use?
I’m currently working with the Canon EOS 6D, the 50mm 1.4mm and the 24-70mm 2.8. And also the Olympus OM-D.

What advise can you give to people?
Never give up, learn from your mistakes and criticism and go for it! I learned the most by just making a lot of pictures, organizing shoots and working with a lot of creative people. And very important, you really need to love what you are doing, because it takes a lot of time and patience to reach your goals.

Favorite websites?
www.vogue.it / www.vogue.nl

Check out more work by Liselotte Fleur here

Gema Méndez

Illustration inspiration

amor y odio

Illustration inspiration

cleopatra

Illustration inspiration

coneja

Illustration inspiration

hora del té

Illustration inspiration

Manzanas doradas

Illustration inspiration

retrato frida Kahlo

Illustration inspiration

sandi

Illustration inspiration

silencio

Illustration inspiration

sirena

Illustration inspiration

Sueños

Work by Gema Damaris Ramírez Méndez. Based in México.

What style do you prefer?
The style I prefer is the surreal mixed with fineart.

How do you get your inspiration?
My inspiration are my dreams and deepest thoughts also my culture Mexican art and surreal art.

What kind of tools do you use?
Use tablet, psd, and other app to illustrate digitally.

What advise can you give to people?
Do not stop dreaming believe and create, for me is the most important because what else comes in addition.

Favorite websites?
getinspiredmagazine.com

Check out more work by Gema Damaris Ramírez Méndez here

Fernando Forero an artist full of talent

From Small Gallery

From Small Gallery

Creativity is a word that fits really well with this young artist, and it is a real pleasure to exchange ideas and reflections about the creative process with him.

Fernando begins his approach talking about his personal sketchbook. He calls it The Black Books.

“A certain malaise invaded me throughout my days. It was my biggest motivation to justify my creation.”

“A feeling of a certain sadness settled in me. Meanwhile I was discovering the magic of visual creation through art, movies and comics. I started to collect my father’s Sunday paper. It was a flash in the grey monotony of my town.”

From my Fonts

From my Fonts

Fernando began to copy from the Yellow Pages logos that he just found nice. That was the first glance, his first approach to the world of typography. The world of comics led him to a dreamlike universe, to fantasy and imagination. “The world of Cultural Magazines developed in me serious questionings about life and its meanings, about fragility of existence and thereby took me to learn about philosophy, photography, theater, movies, art or any visual manifestation. That became my world between the tediousness.”

As so on as he finished High School he moved to Bogotá and started buying all sort of quality paper samples and made with them books with black leather covers.

from Bestiary

from Bestiary

The first one was called “Lúgubres Memorias”. The idea was to give an end to his life when he had finished the last page of this book. But he kept drawing, making experiments, collages, and texts. And through this whole exercise everything began to change. “It taught me that creativity is not just something that comes suddenly to enlighten your mind. From the void it is possible to create and build oneself, creativity comes trough the exercise of doing.”

Once the first book was finished he kept creating more, one for writing and another for illustration, so he could be free and experience more and make researches. These sketchbooks became an important component in attaining established goals. Once he got a night job these were progressively refined and filled with more and more material during his little spare time.

from Small Gallery

from Small Gallery

ABOUT THE SKETCHBOOKS

Each new sketchbook represents a new challenge; a new challenge to become a better human being. Every one of them has its very unique symbolism, always an approach of the origins, the continual unfolding of each individual. Each illustration pushes the observer to question about the character and its origins. The work of Fernando is always an intimate piece that invites you to look very closely for the detailed and painstaking work, to appreciate the infinite variation of textures and ornaments in each page. “At the end my sketchbooks become final art pieces by themselves.”

from Cioran Typeface

from Cioran Typeface

CREATIVE PROCESS

Emotional exploration becomes the creative process. Through the sketchbooks, Fernando is not looking to have an acceptation, to please anyone, but for the mere need of expression. It starts with some sinuous lines on a new page and guided by his intuition and senses, he begins to transform it “the same way as if it was a clay model”. When finally he has defined a new art-piece, really organic, he begins to give uniqueness trough details, taking special care to volumes and textures. “At this point I have to make a confession. Maybe I shouldn’t, but I feel attached by this conversation. I think one of the reasons why I construct such bizarre anatomies for my characters, is because unfortunately I don’t have strong bases on technical anatomic drawing; this gives me freedom to generate my own anatomies guided by personal esthetic parameters; I have turned my weakness into strength.”

from The New Black Book

from The New Black Book

Fernando creates during the process of drawing and this attitude has turned into a therapeutically process; that’s why he made of it a ritual, a magic moment in his everyday life. And that is the magic he gives to us.

from Birds

from Birds

from Illustrations

from Illustrations

from Sketching the Life

from Sketching the Life

from MTV LIVE HD

from MTV LIVE HD

from The New Black Book

from The New Black Book

MTV LIVE

MTV LIVE

Check out more work by Fernando Forero on:

http://www.behance.net/fernandoforero
http://www.fernandoforeroart.com
http://www.be.net/fernandoforero
http://khamuslestat.blogspot.com/
http://www.myfonts.com/person/Fernando_Forero/

Béatrice Coron’s Daily Battles

Beatrice-Corons-Daily-Battles

25 February 2013 – I can´t believe this is going to happen; a James Stewart 3d short film about Béatrice Coron´s work is going to be presented as the world premiere at TED Conference in Long beach, California on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

I have been following Béatrice Coron´s work from almost the beginning. I listened fascinated to her TED conversation where after a brilliant speech about the development and growing of her work, she said “And everybody’s a narrator, because everybody has a story to tell. But more important is everybody has to make a story to make sense of the world. And in all these universes, it’s like imagination is the vehicle to be transported with, but the destination is our minds and how we can reconnect with the essential and with the magic. And it’s what story cutting is all about.”

Now, Award-winning 3D director James Stewart, founder of Geneva Film Co. will present his animated 3d short film BÉATRICE CORON’S DAILY BATTLES. James Stewart is a narrator that show us a story (because he also is a narrator of stories), a tapestry made of Beatrice Coron´s narrations. A dream is becoming reality, even better, because when the work of two artists whose imagination melts, something magic appears. It´s no longer the story of one artist; it is a story that tells the story of a hard work, of a creative path so patient, so dedicated, that Director James Stewart gives a masterful touch and introduces us into the multiple layers of medieval scenes with struggles and battles that represent the challenges of life. This abstract montage created in Stereoscopic 3d embraces all these infinite hours of paper cutting, of storytelling memories and gets the signification and mood of a non-linear abstractions and the layered universe that Béatrice Coron has created; a chef-d´oeuvre.

About James Stewart and Geneva Film Co.
James Stewart is an award-winning director and the founder of the Geneva Film Co. in Toronto, Canada. Through his production company, Stewart has produced over 30 projects in digital 3D, including cinema commercials, concerts, stop-motion and CG animation. He is a director, storyteller, artist, digital innovator and multi-platform visual designer whose work ranges from mobile to giant screen, from motion graphics to stereoscopic 3D installations. Recent spots include Samsung, Toyota, Lexus, Sprint, JCPenney.
Recent projects include the stop-motion film FOXED!, the experimental short BÉATRICE CORON’S DAILY BATTLES in collaboration with NYC based French artist Béatrice Coron, Werner Herzog’s CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS, ONTARIO 4D for the Vancouver Olympics, and live 3D concert films of the Montreux Jazz Festival and Kylie Minogue. In 2012, he produced the world’s first gesture-controlled 3D cinema game for the launch of the Samsung Galaxy S3. A sought-after director, artist and expert on 3D, Stewart is a five-time speaker at The Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. He is represented in the US by TateUSA.
Geneva Film Co. can be found on the web at www.genevafilmco.com/3d.
Twitter: @jamesstewart3D

About Béatrice Coron
NYC Artist Béatrice Coron creates intricate worlds with scissors and paper, speaking through “the language of silhouettes.” Born and raised in France, Coron’s work includes illustration, book arts, fine art and public art. She cuts her characteristic silhouette designs in paper and Tyvek, and creates works in stone, glass, metal, rubber, stained glass and digital media. Her work has been purchased by major museum collections, such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Walker Art Center and The Getty. Her public art can be seen in subways, airports, sports facilities, and other venues.
Béatrice Coron can be found on the web at: www.beatricecoron.com
Twitter: @cutstories

Article By Maria Fidalgo

Andy Council

Andy Council’s three-storey high dinosaur in Stokes Croft

Andy Council’s three-storey high dinosaur in Stokes Croft

Luke Powell: What is the fascination with dinosaurs, and how many do you have in Bristol?

Andy Council: I’m not actually sure how many I have; the thing with street work is that it keeps going up and disappearing, some of it stays and some of it gets painted over very quickly.

That said, I also do mural work for local schools, so quite a few of my things stay around a fair bit, I’d say there are around eight pieces in Bristol at the moment.

As for my fascination with dinosaurs… It kind of developed out of some illustrations I did a while ago for a recycling company. I drew some monsters made out of rubbish and they kind of developed out of that into a Bristol city dinosaur that people kind of took to. It’s got a life of its own beyond that, and yeah, I do like dinosaurs as well. They are interesting and so they are interesting forms to go with.

I heard that you had some pretty unusual drawing habits as child too?

Yeah, I remember I went through a really heavy phase when I was in junior school where I’d draw weird things like squirrels with laser guns and beavers with Gatling guns. I guess it is the sort of thing you do as a child…

Have you ever thought to revisit those times?

Not recently, although I was thinking about them the other day.

Do you have a favourite piece at the moment?

From a prestige level, I would say the piece I did in the M-sheds museum in Bristol. It’s a real achievement to be inside a museum setting and it was executed really well.

I also really like the piece I did down in Stokes Croft, which is a three-storey high, purple dinosaur. I had a couple of people help me on that one and it took three or four days to do, but it turned out really well.

Do you prefer working out in the street or in your studio?

Sometimes I quite enjoy working out on the street and it’s quite a satisfaction if you’re aiming to get a piece of work done in a day out on a wall. It can be very strenuous though, the last piece I did really knackered me out. It was just a long wall by a skate park and I just did it for fun, but I was pretty knackered the next day.

My joints are getting a bit older and all that crouching down gets to you. The paint fucks you up a bit too.

Andy Council’s studio that he shares with four other artists

Andy Council’s studio that he shares with four other artists

You can read the rest of this interview in our e-Magazine issue 3. You can download it here: http://getinspiredmagazine.com/e-mag/issue-3/

MISHFIT

mishfit - Brighton North Laines

mishfit – Brighton North Laines

What makes your work stand out from the crowd and what are your influences as an artist?

They’re feminine, bright and elegant … I hope! My work is definitely less gangster and more geisha. My female characters aren’t your typical big-boobed “chicks with guns”, they’re a bit more wily than that!

My inspiration comes from a big mix of Japanese art, tribal culture and ceremonial dress, art novae, the weird and wonderful things that grow in nature, strong female characters, edgy messages and stark contrasts.

I wrap all of this up into vibrant, but simple pieces with flowing lines and a cheeky undertone.

“MY WORK IS DEFINITELY LESS GANGSTER AND MORE GEISHA.” MISHFIT

How did you first get started in street art?

I’ve always been a scribbler. I guess you just get to a point where you’re out and about, drinking and clubbing with your pens on you.

Before long you’re leaving cute robots on the backs of every toilet door and when I did this they got a great reaction, with some bar owners even keeping them when they redecorated. It just went on from there really, stickers, spray paint, paste ups etc.

Can you remember your first piece?

I can remember my first sprayed piece, it was on the side of the warehouse I lived in, in Melbourne.

Back then, my can skills were basically non-existent, but there were some really supportive artists out there who just encouraged me to get on with it.

How did you first get involved with Grafik Warfare, and what is it like being the only female member?

I used to share a studio with the artists SNUB and Matt Sewel and they definitely inspired me. When SNUB set up Grafik Warfare it was just a natural thing for me to join the crew.

As for my gender, it doesn’t really come into it. I might be a bit shorter than most of the guys, which is a pain when you’re trying to paint up high, but you can always jump on someone’s shoulders!

mishfit - Squidling

mishfit – Squidling

You can read the rest of this interview in our e-Magazine issue 2. You can download it here: http://getinspiredmagazine.com/e-mag/issue-2/

SEPR

Mikeycanvas - Sepr

Mikeycanvas – Sepr

When did you first become involved in Bristol’s street art scene and how hard was it to get noticed in the early days when the scene was still
emerging?

SEPR: I would say the first pieces of artwork I produced and put ‘out there’ would probably be old punk gig flyers and illustrations for various zines. I didn’t start painting walls out and about properly until around ‘99-2000! I became involved purely by trying to participate in the one way I knew I could. Friends would put on gigs, write or play in bands or DJ. I could draw and enjoyed it, so that was my contribution to whatever scene existed at the time.

Would you say the music scene played a big part in the development of the city’s art movement? Have there been any other contributing factors?

Just from my own experiences all the music and art scenes seem to have exploded and received a lot of exposure.

Without sounding like an old man, the Internet and social networking sites have obviously played a massive part in this.

Bristol now has a scene that a lot of people seem drawn to and its existing reputation for art and music has become even bigger.

“IF YOU STOP PAINTING FOR A SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME, THERE ARE A WHOLE LOAD OF OTHER ARTISTS READY TO PAINT OVER YOU.” SEPR

So there are more artists to compete with? Is that a good thing?

There are definitely a lot of people painting in Bristol, which is good as it keeps you on your toes. If you stop painting for a short amount of time there are a whole load of other artists ready to paint over you.

I do think that sometimes quantity takes over quality though. When I was starting to paint, I learnt in places like Dean Lane, Bedmo or underneath the M32 motorway which are pretty much hidden away from the general public except for a small handful of nerdy graf types.

Now people are learning to paint in places like Stokes Croft, which is very much out in public for everyone to see. Whilst this is generally a positive thing, it can take a nose dive at times, with the standard of work being pretty poor and people who would’ve previously crafted their skills over time on train lines or in tunnels, are now learning outside peoples shops and houses.

Are you aware of what the public think? And what do you prefer, would you rather have no art than bad art or the other way around?

It’s a difficult subject to get your head around because what is more preferable? Streets with no art on, except the vile images strewn across billboard adverts, or streets covered in art that is just lazy and not that good?

Who decides what is good anyway? Having artwork on people’s doorsteps has divided people for sure.

A lot people love it, a lot of people also hate it and a lot of people seem so exposed to it that they don’t even notice it anymore.

Each person has to make their own mind up and act in the way they see fit.

ASK Wall in Bristol ‘11

ASK Wall in Bristol ‘11

You can read the rest of this interview in our e-Magazine issue 1. You can download it here: http://getinspiredmagazine.com/e-mag/issue-1/

Tuomas Ikonen

Tuomas Ikonen

Tell us something about yourself and how did you get started making awesome work?
I’m Tuomas Ikonen, illustrator and artist from Helsinki, Finland. I live here with my girlfriend and our three cats. As many artists, I’ve drawn since I was a child. In school I was the quiet boy at the back row who spends more time doodling the pages full of monsters than listening what the teacher had to say, you know the type. Later I graduated as a graphic designer, but I knew almost immediately I started my studies that I didn’t wanted to work in the advertising industry. I’ve developed my style during the years, and at the moment I feel that I’ve found my style, or at least I’m going in the right direction.
 
 
Where do you get your inspiration?
I love art in almost all of its forms, especially painting, illustration, architecture, animation and music, so works of other artists inspire me a lot. I like to travel, wandering around in interesting cities and museums, just sitting by the lake watching the sunset or spending time in cafés and bars.
 
 
What tools/techniques do you use and why do you use them?
I sketch my works with pencils, scan them and draw and color rest of the illustration with Photoshop. I use Wacom Intuos3 with my iMac to complete the work. I use lots of different textures with my work, some are from the web, some are my own photos and scans from interesting surfaces. I’m heavily influenced by the design and illustration of 50s to 70s, I love their naïve approach to the world and I want to achieve that kind of feel to my work. Like dusty and scratched pictures from the attic, memories from the past of some weird alternate reality. When I paint, I usually use acryls to plywood. Acryls are great because it dry so quickly, so I can add lots of layers of paint. I like painting on wood, usually I scratch and peel the paint off the surface with knives to look whats underneath it.
 
 
Tell us something about your latest project?
Most of my latest projects have been editorial illustrations for different magazines. These projects are usually quick jobs, it takes one to two days to complete the illustration and the schedules are pretty tight. It’s interesting to do illustrations for clients from different fields, you learn lots of weird and wonderful facts about the world by researching and reading articles that you would normally never read.
 
 
Where do you want to be in the next five years?
Basically I’d like to do the same that I do at the moment, but in a larger scale. In five years I hope to illustrate children’s books and record covers of interesting artists. I’d also like to have time to paint more and exhibit my works in galleries.
 
 
Any cool upcoming projects?
I’m participating in two illustration exhibitions. I’m making a piece for a poster exhibition here in Helsinki and book cover/poster for an exhibition in London. I’m also designing couple of record covers at the moment.
 
 
What would you do if you didn’t do this kind of work?
That is a really difficult question, I couldn’t think anything I’d love to do as much as this. But if I had to choose, it would be something to do with visual arts; interior designer or carpenter sounds interesting. I’ve always been interested in human psychology, so maybe something in that field too.
 
 
What advise can you give to people?
Well I know these sound clichés, but work hard to accomplish what you want to be, draw a lot, be true to yourself. Listen to your mother. Remember, the breakfast is the most important meal of the day.
 
 

Work of Tuomas Ikonen

 
 
Shift Work. Illustration for an article about shift work. Different birds represent different types of workers: owl is at night shift, early bird with worm is at morning shift etc.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Pamper Your Brain. Illustration for an article about how to treat your brain.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Be On Time. Illustration for an article about how to not be late on meetings.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Home safety. Illustration for an article about home safety.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Slow Movement. Illustration for an article about slow movement and slow food.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
The Client is Always Right. Illustration for a book The Medium is the Message and 50 other Ridiculous Advertising Rules.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Illustration for an upcoming album of Finnish band UpsideDown UnderWater.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Cover illustration for an album EP Nothing But Sound by Finnish band MIR.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Thief. Illustration for an article about Thieves in business industry.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 
Killing Creativity. Illustration for an article about killing creativity in workplaces.

Tuomas Ikonen
 
 

Contact details Tuomas Ikonen

 
 
Personal website: www.tuomasikonen.com
Email: info@tuomasikonen.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Tuomas-Ikonen-Art-Illustration/208038545966676
Blog: tuomasikonen.tumblr.com
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/tuomasikonen/
Behance: www.behance.net/tuomasikonen